Benefits Of Tea Tree Oil Soap For Men

As far as essential oil soaps go, tea tree oil really is top-tier. Besides being packed with skin and health benefits, tea tree oil has a relatively neutral, planty scent. So if you want all the benefits of an essential oil soap, without the scent gamble, go with tea tree oil.

Benefits Of Tea Tree Oil Soap

Tea Tree Oil Is Good On Acne And Blemishes

As a heavy sanitizer with anti-inflammatory properties, tea tree oil is great for curing breakouts.

It’ll clear up clogged pores, reduce oil buildup, and cleanse your skin, which is a triple threat when it comes to curbing acne. If you’re like me and you love to pick at your irritated little red spots, tea tree oil will sooth the damage you’re doing to your skin, while preventing future pick-able acne.

Tea Tree Oil Makes For A Good Armpit Soap

Tea tree oil is antifungal, sanitizing, and a solid odor-controller…need I say any more?

Pro-tip: if you’re planning on a movie night with someone special, use some tea tree oil soap (or at least deodorant, come on) before you make any move to put your arm around their shoulders.

Pro-tip part 2: my favorite pickup line of all time is, “If you were a pirate, would you rather keep your parrot on this shoulder, or this shoulder?” [Wrap your arm around their shoulders here.] It’s a very smooth move, 10/10 would recommend. Works especially well if you’re watching a pirate movie of some sort, and deodorized your armpits beforehand.

Tea Tree Oil Repairs Skin Damage 

We talked about tea tree oil as an anti-inflammatory. It’s also an antiseptic!

That means you can use it on cuts, grazes, and bug bites to help ease irritation and speed up the healing process. It’s especially good if you work the kind of job where you’re always coming home with little nics an injuries, whether from metal welding or paper cuts.

Does Tea Tree Oil Soap Kill Bacteria?

Usually I’d say no here – it’s a misconception that soap kills bacteria. Most soaps just wash away bacteria, which is equally effective in the end.

But tea tree oil is the rare exception. It actually does kill certain bacteria, especially the germs that cause seasonal illnesses like colds and flus. So if you’re in need of a heavier soap to fight flu season, tea tree oil can afford you some extra protection.

I should mention, when it comes to killing bacteria, you’re probably better off buying a tea tree oil household cleaning product rather than a soap. Really, any soap will do a good job of disinfecting your hands. If you want to more effectively prevent the spread of bacteria, you also need to disinfect household surfaces.

Does Tea Tree Oil Lighten Skin?

Tea tree oil won’t lighten or brighten your skin. In fact, compared to other natural soaps, it’s not necessarily amazing as a complexion toner.

It will definitely help you fight acne and blemishes, but if you’re looking for something to give you a sort of glow, tea tree oil is not the way to go. Try the benefits of dead sea mud soap instead.

I actually find tea tree oil more appealing because it’s not a skin brightener. Lots of soaps over promise their skin-lightening benefits. Or, when worst comes to worst, they pack each bar with bleaching agents that will temporarily lighten your skin, while doing long-term health damage throughout your body.

Tea tree oil doesn’t over market itself like that, which is a green flag for me.

Does Tea Tree Soap Dry Out Skin?

The opposite actually. Tea tree oil soap should leave you feeling hydrated and moisturized.

That’s the case with most essential oil soaps. Anytime a soapmaker adds a new fat or oil to the mix, they increase the moisturizing benefits of the bar (which makes sense logically, right?). 

Plus, most handmade soaps are packed with skin-hydrating ingredients, so you don’t have to worry about tea tree oil (or any natural soap) drying out your skin.